Physical science – No Physic http://nophysic.com/ Sat, 30 Oct 2021 18:56:06 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://nophysic.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/physic-120x120.png Physical science – No Physic http://nophysic.com/ 32 32 Converging Cancer Seminar Series – Engineering and Physical Sciences to Advance Cancer Research (Chemistry and Bioengineering) | Events https://nophysic.com/converging-cancer-seminar-series-engineering-and-physical-sciences-to-advance-cancer-research-chemistry-and-bioengineering-events/ https://nophysic.com/converging-cancer-seminar-series-engineering-and-physical-sciences-to-advance-cancer-research-chemistry-and-bioengineering-events/#respond Fri, 29 Oct 2021 18:19:16 +0000 https://nophysic.com/converging-cancer-seminar-series-engineering-and-physical-sciences-to-advance-cancer-research-chemistry-and-bioengineering-events/ In this webinar series presented by the Cancer Research UK Convergence Science Center at Imperial College London and the Institute of Cancer Research in London, researchers from both organizations will discuss the main challenges facing cancer research and the opportunities for new converging scientific approaches to address these. Join us to examine how new approaches […]]]>

In this webinar series presented by the Cancer Research UK Convergence Science Center at Imperial College London and the Institute of Cancer Research in London, researchers from both organizations will discuss the main challenges facing cancer research and the opportunities for new converging scientific approaches to address these. Join us to examine how new approaches and technologies could shed light on unresolved issues in cancer biology, innovate new ways to tackle cancer challenges, and bring pioneering treatments to cancer patients faster.

Hosted by the Scientific Director of the Center for Convergence Sciences, Professor Axel Behrens, the series aims to support the Centre’s mission to facilitate collaboration between traditionally separate and distinct disciplines.

Please join us on Thursday November 4, 3:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m., for two conferences of:

Dr Nazila Kamaly – Department of Chemistry, Imperial College London

“Nanomedicines and their role in modern cancer therapy”

The administration and therapy of drugs activated by nanoparticles is revolutionizing the field of medicine, as we have seen recently with vaccines based on solid lipid nanoparticles based on Covid-19 mRNA. For the past two decades, the application of nanotechnology in oncology has aimed to provide more effective and safer cancer treatment, with commonly used nanotherapies such as Doxil now on the market as ‘nanosimilars’. Considerable technological success has been achieved in this area although we have not seen a new paradigm shift in cancer therapy with nanodrugs. This is in part due to challenges arising from the complexities and heterogeneity of tumor biology, an incomplete understanding of nano-bio interactions and complex chemistries, scaling, fabrication and required controls. for clinical translation and commercialization, which the field is actively addressing and will be discussed in this conference.

Dr Nazila Kamaly is a lecturer in the Department of Chemistry and an expert in nanomedicine. She uses bioinspired approaches to develop targeted multifunctional polymeric nanomedicines capable of modifying their surface or core properties in response to local or upregulated disease markers for precise, stimuli-responsive and spatiotemporally controlled drug delivery. His laboratory is also developing biomimetic and biomicrofluidic models to better screen and understand nano-bio interactions at the cellular level.

&

Dr Nuria Oliva-Jorge – Department of Bioengineering, Imperial College London

“Selective tumor nanotherapies against cancer”

In this talk, Dr. Oliva-Jorge will describe the new approaches developed in her group to achieve tumor selectivity of cancer treatments using nanotechnology. It is not uncommon for powerful anti-cancer drugs to have dose-limiting toxicity, due to their unintended effects on healthy cells. Using rational nanoparticle design and engineering, we can enable the selective uptake of nanoparticles and / or drug release in cancer cells only, thereby minimizing side effects on healthy cells.

Dr Nuria Oliva-Jorge is currently a research fellow at Imperial College in the Department of Bioengineering. An organic chemist by training, Nuria obtained her doctorate in medical engineering and medical physics from MIT in 2016. Her thesis focused on biomaterials combined with nanotechnology for the local treatment of breast cancer. In 2018, Nuria joined the Almquist laboratory at Imperial College London as a postdoctoral fellow to work on nanotechnologies for wound healing and tissue regeneration. His independent group works at the intersection of biomaterials, biology and medicine to develop new smart medical technologies to fight complex human diseases.

Registration

To receive information on how to access this event, please send an email icr-imperial-convergence.centre@imperial.ac.uk

Note: This webinar is exclusively for colleagues at the Institute of Cancer Research, Imperial College London, Royal Marsden Hospital and Imperial College Healthcare.


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Robert Dillingham’s Blog: Welcoming Coaches, Gold with USA Basketball, Physical Sciences and More https://nophysic.com/robert-dillinghams-blog-welcoming-coaches-gold-with-usa-basketball-physical-sciences-and-more/ https://nophysic.com/robert-dillinghams-blog-welcoming-coaches-gold-with-usa-basketball-physical-sciences-and-more/#respond Mon, 27 Sep 2021 15:14:28 +0000 https://nophysic.com/robert-dillinghams-blog-welcoming-coaches-gold-with-usa-basketball-physical-sciences-and-more/ Combine Academy (Charlotte, NC) playmaker Robert Dillingham is one of the nation’s top pointers and topped the 2021 Summer Pandemic Tour like no other, including an appearance in the title game Peach Jam and breaking the single-game scoring record (31 points) to lead USA Basketball’s U16 team to gold. This has led to a “who’s […]]]>

Combine Academy (Charlotte, NC) playmaker Robert Dillingham is one of the nation’s top pointers and topped the 2021 Summer Pandemic Tour like no other, including an appearance in the title game Peach Jam and breaking the single-game scoring record (31 points) to lead USA Basketball’s U16 team to gold. This has led to a “who’s who” of college contenders who all apply the full-service recruiting press to the 2023 star. Now he’s agreed to give Sports Illustrated exclusive access to his world by doing the show. chronicle of everything that is happening in his world in a monthly blog.



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‘A Hidden Gem’, NMSU’s Physical Science Lab Celebrates Diamond Jubilee https://nophysic.com/a-hidden-gem-nmsus-physical-science-lab-celebrates-diamond-jubilee/ https://nophysic.com/a-hidden-gem-nmsus-physical-science-lab-celebrates-diamond-jubilee/#respond Thu, 16 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://nophysic.com/a-hidden-gem-nmsus-physical-science-lab-celebrates-diamond-jubilee/ By Mike Cook This year is the Diamond Jubilee of the Laboratory of Physical Sciences (PSL) at New Mexico State University, or 75e anniversary, a major milestone for what NMSU Chief of Staff Leslie Cervantes calls one of southern New Mexico’s “hidden gems”. “A lot of people don’t know what PSL is or what we […]]]>

By Mike Cook

This year is the Diamond Jubilee of the Laboratory of Physical Sciences (PSL) at New Mexico State University, or 75e anniversary, a major milestone for what NMSU Chief of Staff Leslie Cervantes calls one of southern New Mexico’s “hidden gems”.

“A lot of people don’t know what PSL is or what we do,” said Marcella Shelby, Ph.D., head of strategic initiatives at PSL.

PSL was created in 1946 to support US military telemetry and missile systems, said director Eric L. Sanchez. Now, 75 years later, PSL works with the United States Department of Defense, NASA, Federal Aviation Administration, Los Alamos National Laboratory and many others on a wide range of programs and projects across the countries and around the world. About 40% of the work PSL does is classified, Sanchez said.

Housed in Clinton P. Anderson Hall, 1050 Stewart St., PSL covers 7 acres on NMSU’s Las Cruces campus.

Sanchez, a retired U.S. Army Brigadier General and former White Sands Missile Range commander, is a 1987 Distinguished Military Graduate of the NMSU with a degree in education. He became director of PSL in June 2020 after 32 years of active military service, including deployments to the Middle East and the Republic of Korea, the NMSU said.

Today, PSL’s “domain expertise” continues to include work on telemetry and missile systems, as well as electronic warfare, countermeasures to detect, avoid or distract weapon systems. or an enemy’s tactics, unmanned aerial systems, science balloons (including a program to help bring broadband to the Navajo Nation) and custom flight gear.

PSL is also an asset for business and economic development, Sanchez said, and provides educational and work opportunities for students.

Like many organizations, PSL has been slowed down by the pandemic, Sanchez said. But in mid-July, the installation “was in line with what we were doing before Covid,” he said.

“Over the past 10 years, PSL has contracted and spent on research averaging $ 37 million per year,” Shelby said.

There are plans for major growth for PSL over the next five years, including doubling the size of its program, Sanchez said. This will mean substantial investments in information technology and infrastructure, he said, and an intensification of PSL’s involvement as a regional leader in economic development and its support for student learning and education. preparation for the workforce.

PLS launched the Classified Ready Employee Workforce (CREW) program in 2020 to nurture the next generation of national security workforce, Sanchez said. The two-year co-op program helps students learn about national security and gain permission to access classified systems, making them “very, very marketable” to potential employers, he said. .

CREW students have often been hired prior to graduation by companies like General Dynamics and Northrup Grumman and “are now leaders in the field,” said Shelby, who earned a doctorate in economic development from NMSU in 2015. After graduation, she worked for the New Mexico Economic Development Loan Fund and then moved to California. Shelby returned to NMSU to work for PSL in August 2020.

CREW has gained national attention from executives at Spaceport America, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and others, Sanchez and Shelby said.

“It has to be a national program,” Sanchez said.

PSL currently has around 150 employees, including engineers, scientists and support staff, and that number is expected to increase to 200 by the end of 2022, Shelby said. The lab employs an average of 25 students and 10 co-op students each semester.

“Since 1946, nearly 20,000 students have passed through our doors as student and co-op employees,” Shelby said.

PSL has an “enthusiastic and dedicated workforce,” said Sanchez. “Everyone gives 100% every day. “

As PSL gets additional grants and contracts, there are “a lot of ideas and a lot of opportunities for innovation,” Shelby said.

“For NMSU to be successful, PSL must be successful,” Sanchez said.

“PSL has such a rich history of working on issues of national importance,” said NMSU Chancellor Dan Arvizu. “When I was a student in the 1970s, PSL was a vibrant place that did a great job, especially with satellite tracking around the world. At the time, they had hundreds of co-op students, including several of my friends. PSL is a great asset to the country, to our state and to the NMSU. “

Clinton P. Anderson Hall

The building that houses PSL was built in 1965 and consecrated that on October 23 of the same year, the 70e birthday of U.S. Senator Clinton Presba Anderson, DN.M.

Anderson (1895-1975) was a United States Senator from 1949 to 1973 and was a member of the United States House of Representatives from New Mexico, was United States Secretary of Agriculture during the Truman administration (1945-48) and was the ninth treasurer of the state of New Mexico. (1933-34).

More than 800 people attended the dedication, which included a birthday cake for Anderson. Baked by the NMSU Food Service Bakery, it was the largest cake ever baked in the state, including over 100 pounds of frosting, according to NMSU records. Anderson was chairman of the United States Senate Committee on Aeronautical and Space Sciences, 1963-73, and was a strong supporter of the United States space program.

Visit psl.nmsu.edu.


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Third-year physical science classes will likely be online until reading week – The University Times https://nophysic.com/third-year-physical-science-classes-will-likely-be-online-until-reading-week-the-university-times/ https://nophysic.com/third-year-physical-science-classes-will-likely-be-online-until-reading-week-the-university-times/#respond Thu, 19 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://nophysic.com/third-year-physical-science-classes-will-likely-be-online-until-reading-week-the-university-times/ Third-year physical science students will “likely” have online classes until Nov. 1, according to an email sent to international students yesterday. The email was sent to inform students making decisions about returning to Dublin and said other third year physics students will also be notified shortly. It’s unclear whether first, second and fourth year physical […]]]>

Third-year physical science students will “likely” have online classes until Nov. 1, according to an email sent to international students yesterday.

The email was sent to inform students making decisions about returning to Dublin and said other third year physics students will also be notified shortly.

It’s unclear whether first, second and fourth year physical science students will also have online classes through reading week.

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The director of the physical sciences course, Professor Cormac McGuiness, said in the email that, since students will be required to maintain a social distance of at least one meter, “until November 1, the lectures will be either pre-recorded videos or live online videos “.

The laboratories will be face to face and on campus.

That would be the case “unless we have access to bigger rooms,” he said.

Students might expect in-person classes to return to very close to “normal” for the second half of Semester 1, ”McGuinness said.

After that point, he added, “we should have all the conferences on campus and face to face.”

Indoor social distancing requirements on campus will be lifted for the second half of the semester. The email added that in-person conferences can be arranged if larger rooms are available.

Earlier this week, University times reported that the College lifted the one hour and 45 minute time limit for labs and practicals. All JS physical science lab hands-on work will take place in person on campus.

McGuiness also confirmed that all face-to-face lectures will be recorded for later viewing and that schedules will be made available to students starting September 1.

Earlier today, University times reported that Trinity’s History Department will be hosting classes of less than 20 students online due to lack of adequate space.

Each Trinity school has been assigned specific classrooms to provide in-person instruction. The lack of rooms means that some courses of 12 to 18 students will be done online.

In an email statement to University timesProfessor Ruth Karras, head of the history department, said: “The history department will have to organize online class meetings due to the lack of space. Each school has been assigned specific classrooms and with the distancing there simply aren’t enough rooms for 12-18 students. “

“We can only schedule lessons at certain times due to the TEP ‘pillar’ structure (so they will be available to students doing TJH). “

Karras said that for third and fourth year students, all modules would have at least some in-person instruction.

“No JS or SS history module will be taught entirely online. If they meet twice a week, one of those two meetings will be in person, and if they meet weekly, every other week will be in person.

“The modules that meet every two weeks will be done in person. If a mod appears on someone’s schedule with a different schematic than this, it’s an IT issue that will be resolved, ”Karras added.

In an email to staff and students last week, COO Orla Cunningham and Director of College Health David McGrath said, “When the term starts September 13 (or September 27 for the first few years) , students are allowed on campus – person) events in which they are involved.

“Large conferences over 150 will continue to be online. For conferences between 50 and 150, schools have the discretion to decide whether they should be in person or online. Students who do not have in-person events scheduled on a given day will be asked not to show up on campus to manage the overall capacity of the campus, ”they said.

The email did not indicate how long the large conferences would continue to be held virtually.
“Guidelines for orientation weeks will be finalized and published once public health guidelines for that period are released by the government. “

“Trinity is preparing for a return to campus with increased on-site activity and in-person teaching in accordance with the discretionary framework A Safe Return to Complementary and Superior Teaching and Research on-site than the Education Sector superior agreed with the government. The framework’s clear intention is to deliver a “predominantly on-site learning experience for students and learners” for the year 2021/22, “the email added.


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Why It’s Time to Start Tabata – The Ultimate 80/20 Workout In Physical Science https://nophysic.com/why-its-time-to-start-tabata-the-ultimate-80-20-workout-in-physical-science/ https://nophysic.com/why-its-time-to-start-tabata-the-ultimate-80-20-workout-in-physical-science/#respond Wed, 11 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://nophysic.com/why-its-time-to-start-tabata-the-ultimate-80-20-workout-in-physical-science/ Small Time, Big Impact – Tabata Workout Should Be Your Next Favorite Workout Trying to get in shape but feel like you don’t have time? Are you feeling too tired to exercise while feeling fatigued from not exercising? It’s a vicious circle. RELATED: How Often Should You Train? While the mainstream fitness industry is offering […]]]>

Small Time, Big Impact – Tabata Workout Should Be Your Next Favorite Workout

Trying to get in shape but feel like you don’t have time? Are you feeling too tired to exercise while feeling fatigued from not exercising? It’s a vicious circle.

RELATED: How Often Should You Train?

While the mainstream fitness industry is offering endless advice on cardio training, strength training, and yoga, you have yet to figure out how to put it all together in a 24-hour day. In addition to maintaining a certain balance in your professional and personal life.

Clearing an hour out of your schedule each day may not be possible for your ATM, but almost anyone can find 20 minutes to spare if they make it a priority.

This is where Tabata comes in.


What is Tabata?


In the mid-1990s, a Japanese researcher, Dr Izumi Tabata, faced a unique challenge. He was responsible for improving the performance of the Japanese Olympic speed skating team.

Speed ​​skating requires explosive force over long periods of time, so athletes must have the stamina of a gazelle and the speed of a cheetah. To improve athlete performance, Dr. Tabata looked at circuit training to see if it could give the team an edge.

Tabata and her team researched two groups of athletes. The first group trained at a moderate intensity level while the second group trained at a high intensity level.

The moderate intensity group trained five days a week for a total of six weeks, each workout one hour. The high intensity group trained four days a week for six weeks; each workout lasted 4 minutes and 20 seconds for a full circuit. Each set consisted of 20 seconds of total effort of a given exercise, followed by 10 seconds of rest between each set before moving on to the next set of exercises.

Group 1 had increased their cardiovascular system but showed little to no results for their anaerobic system. Group 2 showed a much greater increase in their cardiovascular system than Group 1 and increased their anaerobic system by 28 percent.

This research led to the creation of a science-backed fitness framework: the Tabata Protocol.


The benefits of Tabata


Lack of time : The biggest benefit that Tabata Protocol offers is that it saves time. By increasing the intensity in a limited time, you force your body to adapt in the most efficient way.

Improves conditioning and stimulates metabolism: In addition to the improved conditioning aerobic and anaerobic benefits, your metabolism improves. Research reveals that participants continued to burn calories 12 hours after training.

Increases Fat Loss and Improves Overall Strength: According to Dr. Jerry Bailey, Certified Nutritionist and Physician in Functional Medicine at Lakeside Holistic Health, Tabata training “also improves the expression of oxidative enzyme activity in fatty acids, resulting in increased fat loss and decreased fat. inflammation in the body. It decreases central arterial stiffness, resulting in better vascular flexibility while simultaneously increasing testosterone and growth hormone. This is due to the positive stress placed on the body by the Tabata protocol. It acts as a trigger to release a cascade of positive chain reactions to make you stronger from the inside out.

Improves mental health: There is also some evidence that shows Tabata improves mental performance. Dr. Bailey notes that it induces the creation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). “During strenuous exercise, BDNF is released from skeletal muscles, which can then facilitate crosstalk between the nervous system and the muscle,” he says. “Due to the increase in BDNF, acetylcholine, dopamine, and serotonin increase with Tabata training. These increases translate to better mood, increased feelings of happiness, less depression, and less anxiety.


RELATED: Best Workouts for Mental Health


How to do the Tabata program


The Tabata protocol is simple, but simple doesn’t mean easy. To follow the style of the Tabata program, you must:

Below is an example of a set. As noted above, eight sets of each exercise make up a complete circuit.

  • Push ups – 20 seconds
  • Rest – 10 seconds
  • Star jumps – 20 seconds
  • Rest – 10 seconds
  • Bodyweight squats – 20 seconds
  • Rest – 10 seconds
  • Slits – 20 seconds
  • Rest – 10 seconds
  • Burpees – 20 seconds
  • Rest – 10 seconds
  • Rows of dumbbells – 20 seconds
  • Rest – 10 seconds
  • Mountaineers – 20 seconds
  • Rest – 10 seconds
  • Bite – 20 seconds

(Repeat x 8)


RELATED: Celebrity Trainer Hacks for Toning Up


The final circuit


Incorporating the Tabata protocol into your daily routine should be relatively easy. It doesn’t require a lot of extra time and you still get the challenge and results you expect from a workout.

You can also apply the Tabata timing practice to your current workouts. If you run outdoors or on a treadmill, for example, you can do a series of circuits using 20-second maximum effort followed by slower 10-second rest periods.

You can also do a “vague” periodization. This is where you do a 20-minute day of a Tabata circuit, followed by a 15-minute circuit the next day, then a 10-minute circuit, and finally a 4-minute circuit. Then you start going up the ladder and then back down, like a wave.

Do you feel exhausted from giving your all? Vary your intensity level between rounds and / or training days. The important thing is consistency and commitment of efforts.

With Tabata, the less time you spend on it every day, the more you get.


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WWF statement on the UN IPCC report, Climate Change 2021: Physical Sciences https://nophysic.com/wwf-statement-on-the-un-ipcc-report-climate-change-2021-physical-sciences/ https://nophysic.com/wwf-statement-on-the-un-ipcc-report-climate-change-2021-physical-sciences/#respond Tue, 10 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://nophysic.com/wwf-statement-on-the-un-ipcc-report-climate-change-2021-physical-sciences/ In response to the release of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report, Climate Change 2021: The Physical Science, World Wildlife Fund (WWF) issued the following statements: Marcene Mitchell, Senior Vice President of the World Wildlife Fund for Climate Change, said: “This report illustrates more than alarming figures. It paints a picture of the […]]]>

In response to the release of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report, Climate Change 2021: The Physical Science, World Wildlife Fund (WWF) issued the following statements:

Marcene Mitchell, Senior Vice President of the World Wildlife Fund for Climate Change, said:

“This report illustrates more than alarming figures. It paints a picture of the reality of the climate crisis, with more intense and frequent extreme weather events causing devastating losses in communities and ecosystems around the world. Some of the threats of climate change are here to stay, but the report makes it clear that we shouldn’t throw in the towel. Through bold and immediate federal action, with strong commitments from the private sector, and with approaches that recognize nature’s essential role in solving this crisis, we can limit the vulnerability of current and future generations to change. climate. “

Rebecca Shaw, Chief Scientist of the World Wide Fund for Nature, said:

“This report is truly a game-changer as it allows scientists to determine humanity’s role in driving extreme weather events with more precision and certainty than ever before. It is clear that fires, floods, storms and heat waves are more extreme due to climate change.

“Scientists are certain that emissions from human activity have caused dangerous and permanent damage to the planet. Our window to reduce emissions and limit temperatures to 1.5 ° C is still possible, but it closes quickly.

“Conserving and restoring nature is a powerful tool in removing carbon from our atmosphere, but it is not enough unless we also drastically reduce our emissions. “

/ Public distribution. This material is from the original organization / authors and may be ad hoc in nature, edited for clarity, style and length. The views and opinions expressed are those of the author (s). See it in full here.


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Meera Komarraju: SIU Agriculture, Life Sciences and Physical Sciences Programs Prepare Students for Success | UES https://nophysic.com/meera-komarraju-siu-agriculture-life-sciences-and-physical-sciences-programs-prepare-students-for-success-ues/ https://nophysic.com/meera-komarraju-siu-agriculture-life-sciences-and-physical-sciences-programs-prepare-students-for-success-ues/#respond Mon, 24 May 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://nophysic.com/meera-komarraju-siu-agriculture-life-sciences-and-physical-sciences-programs-prepare-students-for-success-ues/ The newly formed College of Agricultural, Life, and Physical Sciences (CALPS) combines a variety of programs that prepare students to solve real-world problems during their careers. A summer internship in agricultural crop protection with industry partner Syngenta helped a student move from an interest in law to a major in soil and crop environment management […]]]>

The newly formed College of Agricultural, Life, and Physical Sciences (CALPS) combines a variety of programs that prepare students to solve real-world problems during their careers.

A summer internship in agricultural crop protection with industry partner Syngenta helped a student move from an interest in law to a major in soil and crop environment management and a minor in microbiology. At SIU, this student continues to gain practical experience by working in plant pathology laboratories with Drs. Jason Bond and Ahmad Fakhoury, doing industry sponsored research on soybeans. Likewise, Forestry has a long-standing relationship with a southern Illinois tree care professional who hosts an annual field day at SIU’s Touch of Nature Environmental Center, providing students with hands-on training in arboriculture. and vegetation management. “Many students then turn to these high-paying, in-demand professions that weren’t even on their radar when they first considered studying forestry,” notes forestry professor John Groninger. “We often hear employers say they appreciate the positive attitude and work ethic of the Salukis they hire, and they keep coming back for more. For example, another student who did a summer internship in tree care and natural area management in rural southern Illinois and the St. Louis area learned to talk about nature to people from a variety of backgrounds and learn the skills to help them take better care of their environment. .

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Research skills to solve real world problems

This spring, one of CALPS ‘outstanding scholars and student researchers, Lincoln Weber, was named the Barry Goldwater Fellow, one of 410 American students to receive this prestigious award for excellence in education. A native of Lafayette, Indiana, Lincoln is a physics student specializing in materials and nanophysics. He works in the laboratory of Professor Saikat Talapatra and their work aims to improve the functioning of magnetic memory for next-generation computing devices. Like many UES students, Weber joined a research lab as a freshman, giving him years of hands-on research experience and a great start to his burgeoning scientific career.

Finally, CALPS faculty, staff and students have made significant contributions to local, state and national efforts to fight the pandemic. These efforts have included the production by the Fermentation Science Institute of an ethanol-based “Saluki Sanitizer” to help alleviate the shortage of hand sanitizer last summer, and the production by the School of Biological Sciences of tens of thousands of units of viral transport medium for covid-19 tests performed statewide. Additionally, Associate Professor Keith Gagnon, jointly appointed in Chemistry and Biochemistry and the School of Medicine, runs an interdisciplinary laboratory that includes undergraduate and graduate students who have recently gained international attention for their discovery of ‘a new variant of the virus. This new viral variant, called 20C-US, would originate in the United States and would have been traced by the Gagnon laboratory to Texas as early as May.

As we look forward to face-to-face classes next fall, Salukis in general – and CALPS Salukis in particular – can take great pride in their real-world experiences that set them up for professional success.

Meera Komarraju, Rector and Vice-Chancellor for Academic Affairs, SIU Carbondale

Meera Komarraju is president and vice-chancellor for academic affairs at Southern Illinois University Carbondale.


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The NMSU physical science laboratory, uAvionix partner to support networked autonomous UAS operations https://nophysic.com/the-nmsu-physical-science-laboratory-uavionix-partner-to-support-networked-autonomous-uas-operations/ https://nophysic.com/the-nmsu-physical-science-laboratory-uavionix-partner-to-support-networked-autonomous-uas-operations/#respond Thu, 22 Apr 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://nophysic.com/the-nmsu-physical-science-laboratory-uavionix-partner-to-support-networked-autonomous-uas-operations/ New Mexico State University’s Physical Sciences Lab will partner with uAvionix to deploy SkyLine, uAvionix’s managed command and control platform, to support systems operations. Networked autonomous unmanned aircraft at the NMSU PSL UAS flight test site. PSL operates one of seven Federal Aviation Administration approved UAS flight test sites. The NMSU UAS FTS is centered […]]]>

New Mexico State University’s Physical Sciences Lab will partner with uAvionix to deploy SkyLine, uAvionix’s managed command and control platform, to support systems operations. Networked autonomous unmanned aircraft at the NMSU PSL UAS flight test site.

PSL operates one of seven Federal Aviation Administration approved UAS flight test sites. The NMSU UAS FTS is centered at Las Cruces International Airport and can fly anywhere in the country using unrestricted public airspace.

The NMSU UAS flight test site operates its own fleet of UAS ranging from small battery powered units to complex medium altitude systems and has a team of pilots, crews, engineers and technicians to advance research and development of new technologies for homeland security, agriculture, defense, science and development of supporting standards for UAS regulators for the integration of unmanned systems into the national airspace system.

“As part of this partnership, uAvionix will supply and install SkyLine, its enterprise command and control infrastructure management service, which has been designed from the ground up to meet aeronautical design standards for critical UAS and UAM applications. SkyLine sets a new standard by combining certified hardware and software into services for seamless management of UAS missions and infrastructure, ”said Christian Ramsey, president of uAvionix. “The introduction of our managed command and control capabilities at the PSL UAS flight test site allows NMSU’s PSL customers to develop certifiable platforms and safety case approval for operations beyond the visual line of site operations. “

“The safe integration of unmanned aviation with manned aviation is of the utmost importance to our PSL customers and the PSL UAS test flight team,” said Henry Cathey, director of PSL Aerospace Division and the NMSU UAS flight test site. “The introduction of SkyLine will allow our customers to safely build and test their systems in a certifiable manner. “

“Partnering with uAvionix in the deployment of this important C2 platform will ensure that our faculty and trained pilot staff remain at the forefront of technological development,” said Eric Sanchez, director of PSL. “The SkyLine system is a critical asset for the NMSU and the Borderplex in supporting an ecosystem that facilitates the further growth and development of a UAS industry in the region. “

The SkyLine C2 platform consists of scalable and robust ground radio hardware communicating with aircraft airborne radios (microLink) operating from 902 to 928 MHz which are managed by a cloud-based network service layer (SkyLine) , which monitors and manages signal strength, roaming / handoffs and provides centralized control for critical operations and beyond visual line of sight.

For high-risk operations such as air mobility and critical infrastructure, uAvionix develops RTCA DO-362A C-Band GRS and ARS hardware for maximum reliability and protection by operating on licensed protected spectrum to avoid unwanted interference and dangerous.

NMSU’s PSL was founded in 1946 in response to the country’s space and rocket programs. The growth of PSL’s capabilities and talents has enabled the university to provide exceptional support to many scientific and technical activities across the country and around the world.

Today’s domain expertise includes electronic warfare, countermeasures, cybersecurity, telemetry and missile systems, 21st century aerospace, and science balloons. PSL maintains a catalog of telemetry and antenna systems designed and built in its laboratory. In addition, custom flight equipment can be designed to meet customer needs.

Author: Marcella Shelby – NMSU

***

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Les Matriculants Mdantsane excel in maths and physical sciences through thick and thin https://nophysic.com/les-matriculants-mdantsane-excel-in-maths-and-physical-sciences-through-thick-and-thin/ https://nophysic.com/les-matriculants-mdantsane-excel-in-maths-and-physical-sciences-through-thick-and-thin/#respond Fri, 09 Apr 2021 09:12:02 +0000 https://nophysic.com/les-matriculants-mdantsane-excel-in-maths-and-physical-sciences-through-thick-and-thin/ Despite the enormous challenges faced by the Matrix Class of 2020, learners benefiting from the Promaths program in Mdantsane Township, east London, seized the opportunity to achieve outstanding performance in math and physical science. The arrival of the Covid-19 pandemic in South Africa has disrupted academic learning on an unprecedented scale, with the strict lockdown […]]]>

Despite the enormous challenges faced by the Matrix Class of 2020, learners benefiting from the Promaths program in Mdantsane Township, east London, seized the opportunity to achieve outstanding performance in math and physical science.

The arrival of the Covid-19 pandemic in South Africa has disrupted academic learning on an unprecedented scale, with the strict lockdown introduced in March of last year proving particularly trying for subjects preparing for their very final exams. important.

Yet, as it has successfully done in previous years, the Promaths program at the Kutlwanong Center for Maths, Science and Technology (“Kutlwanong”) has not only succeeded in guiding learners through troubled waters, but also delivered results. exceptional in these two “gateways”. ” topics.

The program is designed to accelerate high performance outcomes among grade 10-12 learners in previously deprived areas of South Africa and, for many years, has had an excellent track record in the Mdantsane cohort.

As was the case with learners and institutions across the rest of the country, the Promaths 2020 cohort was forced to cope with the effects of the pandemic, and for many this included the emotional trauma of losing loved ones.

Many parents and guardians have also lost their jobs, while some households have suffered from domestic violence and other forms of violence.

Covid-19 also meant that Promaths centers had to rethink their strategies while recognizing that internet connectivity and web access in townships and rural areas remains a huge problem in South Africa.

But by using a combination of online and face-to-face teaching sessions, Promaths was able to keep learners firmly on track, and also recover the sessions that had been lost due to the lockdown.

The result for the Mdantsane cohort exceeded what even the program facilitators would have imagined.

The group of 60 learners from the Eastern Cape recorded 100% pass rates in math and physical sciences, but more impressively, they achieved overall averages of 63% and 67% in these two subjects respectively.

There were also 13 honors for mathematics and 22 astounding honors for physical sciences among the learners of Promaths of Mdantsane.

Remembering that 2020 has been a year like no other in recent history, some of the results are nothing short of spectacular.

Likhona Mnyamana, from Khulani Commercial High School in Mdantsane, scored near perfect 98% in math and 97% in physical science, while another Khulani learner, Faith Tonnie, scored 86% in math and 90% in physical sciences.

At Wongalethu High School, located in Unit 2 of Mdantsane, Lipelo Morris left school with 86% for mathematics and 91% for physical sciences.

Kelly Mugonera, of Sandisiwe High School, also scored 80% for mathematics and 87% for physical sciences.

To measure how well Promaths learners benefit from the program, in the 2019 National Senior Certificate exams, the Eastern Cape average pass rate for math and physical science was 41.8% and 70.3% respectively.

By comparison, Mdantsane’s Promath learners reached 98% and 99.8% respectively.

This is the kind of success that Kutlwanong CEO Tumelo Mabitsela has grown accustomed to over the past 15 years thanks to the tireless efforts of the Promaths team who, during that time, have pushed over 22,000 learners to higher peaks.

Mabitsela also attributes this success to private sector partnerships with funders like the Datatec Educational and Technology Foundation, which has been funding the Mdantsane Promaths group for 10 years.

The Foundation aims to improve education, especially in “STEM” (science, technology, engineering and

mathematics), in disadvantaged communities in South Africa.

“Besides the lack of vital skills that math and science education fills, many people overlook the daily real-world needs that these vital subjects play in our ordinary lives, such as helping us solve problems, or reason logically. , or question our thinking, ”says Mabitsela.

“Ultimately our dream as an organization is to see disadvantaged black learners rise through the ranks and pursue careers in engineering, finance, science, math and technology. Nothing makes me happier than when I hear from professionals in these fields who have already benefited from one of our additional course programs.

Maya Makanjee, president of the Datatec Educational and Technology Foundation, believes it is vital to invest in organizations like Kutlwanong that work directly to meet STEM needs in South Africa.

“Mathematics education faces many challenges in our country, but we believe that with long-term thinking, consistency and partnerships, we can make a significant difference,” she says.

With the growing demand for STEM-based career professionals, the deepening crisis in math education in South Africa desperately requires creative interventions.

Using a multi-pronged approach, Kutlwanong’s Promaths Learning Program offers additional math and science lessons to grade 10, 11 and 12 students. Promaths also focuses on teacher development by providing educational tools to help educators deliver lessons in a more engaging and memorable way.

The content of the curricula is aligned with the curriculum of the national Ministry of Education, so that learners are able to practice in a highly relevant and appropriate manner. And the Promaths model focuses on both mastery of theory and repeated practice of content, with routine testing done to ensure students have grasped one concept before moving on to the next.


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Physics Curriculum Writer – Elevate K-12 https://nophysic.com/physics-curriculum-writer-elevate-k-12/ https://nophysic.com/physics-curriculum-writer-elevate-k-12/#respond Fri, 26 Mar 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://nophysic.com/physics-curriculum-writer-elevate-k-12/ The company: Elevate K-12 is changing the way classrooms operate with live, online, real-time instruction in K-12 schools. Our two main goals are to give students the best quality instructors and to prepare them for the world of the future and to give instructors, especially women, work opportunities, regardless of zip codes. We’re the new […]]]>

The company:

Elevate K-12 is changing the way classrooms operate with live, online, real-time instruction in K-12 schools. Our two main goals are to give students the best quality instructors and to prepare them for the world of the future and to give instructors, especially women, work opportunities, regardless of zip codes. We’re the new way to go to school!

The person:

An experienced, dynamic and tech-savvy science educator with experience in writing high school curricula. Someone with in-depth knowledge of research-based pedagogical approaches and effective assessment strategies.

Work:

  • Develop detailed lesson plans based on curriculum plans, standards and other specifications
  • Design engaging and innovative lessons that leverage technology, research-based strategies and best practices for online physical science / biology education
  • Collaborate with the editorial team to ensure the program shares a common voice
  • Develop formative and summative assessments that accurately monitor student progress
  • Facilitate the preparation of materials, such as activities, projects, study guides and teacher notes that correspond to the lessons
  • Work collaboratively with other content writers to edit and improve lessons

What you will need:

Education:

    • A U.S. state certification in science or equivalent
    • Master of Education (preferred)

To live:

    • High school science teaching experience (online or in person)
    • At least 4 years of experience writing science programs that have been used in the online, public or private school environment

Skills:

    • Communication and interpersonal skills
    • Technical skill: PowerPoint, Word, Google Suite
    • Experience with popular edtech science applications (preferred)

Others:

    • Availability between 8 a.m. and 3 p.m. CST (working hours are flexible, but the ability to be online during this time is important)
    • 1099 Independent short-term contract role

Be part of our story:

Elevate K-12 is charged with an important mission: to change the way K-12 classes and teaching work. Our organization is a radically open-minded, rapidly evolving company. We are a team focused on high performance, dynamism and embodying a collaborative culture at all levels. Our teammates are able to have open and honest discussions that push us towards our mission. Elevate K-12 is in a phase of hyper growth which will continue to open up new challenges and opportunities for our team.

Read the full job description


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